summit-2016

Thank you to everyone who attended the Feedback Summit 2015. We hope you were inspired and challenged to help set the course for this emerging movement.

Read what people are saying about Feedback Summit 2015:

The Disruptive Potential of Feedback – Nonprofit Chronicles

Feedback Summit Tackles the Tough Issues, Fund for Shared Insight

Growing Calls for Nonprofits to Listen to Beneficiaries Prompt Action, Chronicle of Philanthropy

Summit 2015 Video Highlights

Summit 2015 Speakers

Click on name to view bio.

Sheree Bennett
Sheree Bennett
Research and Evaluation Advisor
The International Rescue Committee

Sheree Bennett

Sheree Bennett

Research and Evaluation Advisor
The International Rescue Committee

Sheree Bennett currently serves as a Research and Evaluation Advisor at The International Rescue Committee (IRC), where she works with academic experts to design and manage impact evaluations for governance programs in countries such as the Democratic Republic of Congo, Somalia and Zimbabwe. She also supports the IRC’s Client Voice and Choice Initiative, which seeks to improve’s the organization’s responsiveness to the preferences, needs, desires and expectations of the populations the IRC serves. Her academic training is in the politics of local development and experimental and quantitative research design. Ms. Bennett has experience performing research around community-driven development initiatives in multiple countries, including Haiti, Jamaica, and Zambia. Ms. Bennett is also currently a Ph.D. candidate at Yale University, where she is preparing a dissertation on ‘The Social Psychology of Community-Driven Intiatives.’ Ms. Bennett also holds Masters of Philosophy and a Master of Arts in Political Science from Yale University.

Ken Berger
Ken Berger
Managing Director
Algorhythm

Ken Berger

Ken Berger

Managing Director
Algorhythm
@kenscommentary

Ken spent 30 years providing direct services and overseeing programs and organizations dedicated to serving the underserved. He then moved into positions focused on efforts to positively transform the entire social sector (philanthropy, nonprofits and social enterprises). This focus on transformational change began while he was at Charity Navigator. While there, he undertook efforts to move their ratings of charities from a primary emphasis on overhead, toward a focus on the quality of results reporting, especially outcomes. Now with Algorhythm, he continues this work by helping nonprofit and for profit impact organizations to manage and measure what matters most to meet their mission (measurable, positive outcomes), as well as to improve their overall performance. He also assists all types of grantmakers and investors (foundations, government, corporations and individuals) to identify and support those organizations that show evidence of ongoing learning and adaptability, with the goal of being high performing and, thereby, providing the greatest social value (meaningful and positive change in communities and people’s lives). In addition, he is an active speaker, teacher and writer on a wide ranges of issues of concern to the social sector and those who support it.

Brooke Bocast
Brooke Bocast
Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Anthropology
University of Maryland, College Park

Brooke Bocast

Brooke Bocast

Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Anthropology
University of Maryland, College Park

Dr. Brooke Bocast is an anthropologist and international development professional who specializes in community-centered research design, monitoring, evaluation, and learning, and behavior change communications. She has over a decade of research experience in sub-Saharan Africa with a focus on gender, youth, and global health. Her current book project, “If Books Fail, Try Beauty: Educated Womanhood in the New East African Community,” examines the intersection of education policy and HIV risk behavior among Ugandan university students. Dr. Bocast’s publications have appeared in the Christian Science Monitor, the Council on Foreign Relations’ Africa in Transition blog, Neos: The Journal for the Anthropology of Children and Youth Interest Group, and ICT for Anti-Corruption, Democracy, and Education in East Africa, among others. She has held professional fellowships at the University of Maryland, Northwestern University, and Makerere University (Kampala, Uganda).

Zack Brisson
Zack Brisson
Principal
Reboot

Zack Brisson

Zack Brisson

Principal
Reboot
@zbrisson

Zack is Reboot’s strategist in chief, directing the firm’s comprehensive growth as a social enterprise. He is a principal advisor to clients across Reboot portfolios and guides the team in developing a cohesive vision for a 21st century social contract.

A practicing theorist, Zack has extensive experience bringing community-driven approaches to policy making, program design, and implementation. He has worked in some of the world’s most challenging political environments, including post-revolutionary Tunisia, rural Pakistan, the Niger Delta, and Washington D.C., in the service of delivering more just, accountable, and inclusive governance.

Before co-founding Reboot, Zack led digital strategy for “Enough!”, the Center for American Progress’s project to end genocide and crimes against humanity. His advocacy initiatives brought popular attention to the topic of conflict minerals and contributed to the bipartisan passage of landmark human rights legislation on the sourcing of conflict minerals. Earlier, Zack was a product designer and innovation leader at the National Geographic Society. He chaired a cross-divisional effort to create the brand’s first social media platform and developed a roadmap to move branded consumer goods into sustainable packaging.

Zack speaks regularly on emerging models of governance and how they can help organizations become more responsive to the communities they serve. His conference appearances include the World Summit on the Information Society, International Conference on ICT and Development, and Service Design Global Conference, among others.

Zack is a graduate of the College of William and Mary. On the rare occasions when Reboot is not occupying his attention, he can be found with a good book, a great glass of scotch, and his wonderful wife.

Nancy McGuire Choi
Nancy McGuire Choi
Senior Director of Operations
Development Gateway

Nancy McGuire Choi

Nancy McGuire Choi

Senior Director of Operations
Development Gateway
@nmcchoi

Nancy oversees the day-to-day management and strategic direction of programs in over 30 countries. She focuses on building high-performing teams, continuously improving our solutions and clients’ experiences, and identifying new products and services at the center of transparency and accountability, results management, and citizen engagement. Nancy has extensive experience leading aid management and transparency projects and working with governments and donors around the world.

Previously, Nancy monitored and responded to natural disasters and humanitarian emergencies for USAID’s Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance. Nancy holds an MS in Foreign Service from Georgetown University and a BA from Harvard University.

“Amy
Amy Costello
Founder and Managing Editor
Tiny Spark

“Amy

Amy Costello

Founder and Managing Editor
Tiny Spark
@tinyspark_org

Amy Costello is the Founder and Managing Editor of Tiny Spark, an independent podcast and news program that investigates and reports deeply on philanthropy, nonprofits and international aid.

Prior to launching Tiny Spark, Amy was the Africa Correspondent for PRI’s The World. She has reported for NPR, Marketplace, the BBC World Service, and the Chronicle of Philanthropy. She has worked as an adjunct professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, her alma mater.

Amy’s television investigation about the Playpump, a celebrated idea designed to do good, exposed myriad problems with the technology and became the impetus for launching Tiny Spark. Her PBS television story, Sudan: The Quick and the Terrible, was nominated for an Emmy Award.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tinyspark.org

iTunes podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/tiny-spark/id505053432

Samantha Custer
Samantha Custer
Director, Policy Analysis
AidData

Samantha Custer

Samantha Custer

Director, Policy Analysis
AidData
@samanthajcuster

Samantha is the Director of Policy Analysis for AidData. She has co-authored World Bank papers on open data and citizen feedback with the Open Development Technology Alliance, and assisted former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright to teach a class on foreign policy. Samantha previously advised on multilingual education policy with SIL International and coordinated the advocacy efforts of the Asia Multilingual Education Working Group for UNESCO. She holds a dual masters in Foreign Service and Public Policy from Georgetown University.

Louis Dorval
Louis Dorval
Business Development Advisor
VOTO Mobile

Louis Dorval

Louis Dorval

Business Development Advisor
VOTO Mobile
@loudorval

Louis is an investor and entrepreneur focused on Africa-based tech social enterprises. Louis’ most successful start-up venture is VOTO Mobile. VOTO Mobile is a fast growing social enterprise with offices in Ghana, Senegal Zimbabwe, Kenya, India, Canada and the US. Their services help partners distribute and collect information by engaging the bottom 3B people through their mobile phones. VOTO focuses on interactive voice calls (including IVR) and SMS in local languages, instantly reaching across distance and literacy barriers. In 24 months since launch, their product has been used by 450 organizations to reach over 2 million people across 32 countries (18 in Africa). They have already set-up the international connections that allow partners to call every phone on the planet. Some of their most active users include the World Bank, UNICEF, the Gates Foundation, Facebook, Innovations for Poverty Action, Stanford University, etc… Louis holds a bachelor in engineering from McGill University and an MBA from Oxford University where he was a Skoll Scholar.

Brad Dudding
Brad Dudding
Chief Operations Officer
Center for Employment Opportunities

Brad Dudding

Brad Dudding

Chief Operations Officer
Center for Employment Opportunities
@BradDudding

Brad Dudding’s career has been focused on public and nonprofit management. He joined the Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) in 1994 and now is the Chief Operating Officer overseeing finance, IT, learning and evaluation, and human capital operations. Prior to joining CEO, Mr. Dudding worked at the NYC Office of Management and Budget and as a Municipal Financial Analyst at the New York State Controller’s Office. Brad was educated at Macalester College, University of Missouri (BA, Economics), and Rutgers University (Masters of Urban and Regional Planning).

Caroline Fiennes
Caroline Fiennes
Founder and Director
Giving Evidence

Caroline Fiennes

Caroline Fiennes

Founder and Director
Giving Evidence
@carolinefiennes
Caroline Fiennes is one of the few people whose work has appeared in both The Lancet and OK! Magazine.

She is a leading advocate and campaigner for effective philanthropy, in which she has worked for twelve years. She serves on boards of: Charity Navigator; The Cochrane Collaboration (leading global research house at the centre of evidence-based medicine); and the Center for Effective Philanthropy (US philanthropy think-tank & research house). She works with Innovations for Poverty Action and formerly with J-PAL at MIT. A former award-winning charity CEO herself, she founded Giving Evidence which advises donors of various descriptions and in many countries about effective giving, and conducts research to improve it. Caroline speaks and writes extensively about the need for and barriers to effective giving, e.g., in the Financial Times, Forbes, The Economist, BBC Radio 4, Freakonomics, the Daily Mail, the philanthropy sector press. Her book It Ain’t What You Give, It’s the Way That You Give It is dedicated to all those who miss out because donors make the wrong call, and was described in the press as “indispensable… relentlessly logical… engaging, informative, irreverent … long overdue… Thank goodness somebody’s finally written this book… a tour de force”. Caroline has taught about effective giving at Oxford, Cambridge and Yale.

She holds a surprisingly useful degree in physics and philosophy.

Kathrin Frauscher
Kathrin Frauscher
Program Director and Deputy
Open Contracting Partnership

Kathrin Frauscher

Kathrin Frauscher

Program Director and Deputy
Open Contracting Partnership
@kfrauscher1

Kathrin is the Deputy and Program Director of the Open Contracting Partnership (OCP). The OCP opens up public contracting through disclosure data and engagement to ensure that the trillions of dollars spent each year in public procurement deliver on their promise of public benefit. Previously to joining the OCP, Kathrin was a Governance Specialist at the World Bank Group where for a decade she led open contracting and governance projects and programs in Africa and Asia. Together with the Open Contracting team at the World Bank, she incubated the OCP and helped build its global brand and reach. Kathrin has a Masters in Advanced International Relations from the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of Johns Hopkins University and a BA in Economics from the University of Vienna.

Blair Glencorse
Blair Glencorse
Executive Director
Accountability Lab

Blair Glencorse

Blair Glencorse

Executive Director
Accountability Lab
@blairglencorse

Blair Glencorse is Executive Director of the Accountability Lab, an incubator for creative ideas to build accountability and fight corruption. Recently the Lab has been at the forefront of efforts to generate citizen feedback on relief efforts after the devastating earthquakes in Nepal. Blair is also a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Anti-Corruption and Transparency and a Social Impact Fellow at the Center for High Impact Philanthropy at the University of Pennsylvania. Previously, Blair was an advisor to the now President of Afghanistan, Ashraf Ghani, and worked for the World Bank on issues of governance and development.

Marc Gunther
Marc Gunther
Editor-at-large
Guardian Sustainable
Business US

Marc Gunther

Marc Gunther

Editor-at-large
Guardian Sustainable
Business US

@MarcGunther

Marc Gunther is editor-at-large of Guardian Sustainable Business US. His writing about nonprofits and foundations can be found at Nonprofit Chronicles. Marc previously worked for many years at FORTUNE magazine,and he has written four books, including Faith and Fortune: How Compassionate Capitalism is Transforming American Business (Crown, 2004). He’s also a husband and father, a lover of the outdoors and a marathon runner.

Nick Hamlin
Nick Hamlin
Senior Business Intelligence Analyst
GlobalGiving

Nick Hamlin

Nick Hamlin

Senior Business Intelligence Analyst
GlobalGiving
@nicholashamlin

Nick uses GlobalGiving’s data to answer strategic questions, with a special focus on our nonprofit partner data and social impact tracking. In addition to designing and maintaining our GG Rewards algorithm and our fraud protection systems, Nick lives to make GlobalGiving’s data accessible, understandable, and actionable for everyone. Prior to joining GlobalGiving through the ProInspire Fellowship, he worked as a reliability consulting engineer for Fortune 500 companies around the world and held NSF research positions in China and Thailand. Nick is scheduled to complete his Masters of Information and Data Science at UC Berkeley’s School of Information in Summer 2016 and earned his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering and a B.A. in History from the University of Rochester. Outside the office, he is a proud folk music street performer, amateur haiku poet, and worm farmer.

Nathaniel Heller
Nathaniel Heller
Managing Director
Results for Development Institute

Nathaniel Heller

Nathaniel Heller

Managing Director
Results for Development Institute
@integrilicious

Nathaniel Heller is a Managing Director at the Results for Development Institute (R4D), which he joined in 2014, and leads R4D’s Governance Program. At R4D, Nathaniel works to harness citizen-centric transparency and accountability efforts as drivers of development outcomes.

Prior to joining R4D, Nathaniel co-founded and led Global Integrity, a non-profit organization that promotes government transparency and accountability worldwide through high-quality research, cutting-edge technology, and innovative policy insights. In addition, Nathaniel conceptualized and established the OpenGov Hub, the world’s first open government-themed co-working community with locations in Washington, DC and Kathmandu, Nepal. He also created an emerging markets research company servicing consulting firms and hedge funds, now Foglamp Research, that was successfully spun off from Global Integrity in 2013. Prior to co-founding Global Integrity, Nathaniel served at the US Department of State focusing on European political-military affairs; as a fellow at the Center for Public Integrity reporting on public sector accountability and ethics issues; and as a foreign policy fellow to the late-Senator Edward Kennedy. He currently serves as a civil society steering committee member of the Open Government Partnership, advisory board member of Civio, and on the board of The engine room.

“Renee
Renee Ho
Research Fellow
Feedback Labs

“Renee

Renee Ho

Research Fellow
Feedback Labs
@reneeyho

Renee Ho is research fellow at Feedback Labs.  She has worked at the World Bank, ideas42, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.  She has an MPA from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University and a BA in Political Science from UC Berkeley.

Dan Honig
Dan Honig
Assistant Professor
Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies

Dan Honig

Dan Honig

Assistant Professor
Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies

Dan Honig is Assistant Professor of International Development (IDEV) at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. Dan’s research focuses on the relationship between organizational structure, management practice, and performance in developing country governments and organizations that provide foreign aid.

Dan has held a variety of positions outside of the academy. He was special assistant, then advisor, to successive Ministers of Finance (Liberia); ran a local nonprofit focused on helping post-conflict youth realize the power of their own ideas to better their lives and communities through agricultural entrepreneurship (East Timor); and has worked for a number of local and international NGOs (e.g. Ashoka in Thailand; Center for Jewish-Arab Economic Development in Israel). Dan has a Ph.D. in Public Policy from Harvard’s Kennedy School, where his dissertation focused on the optimal level of autonomy in the delivery of foreign aid. A proud Detroiter, Dan holds a BA from the University of Michigan.

Genevieve Maitland Hudson
Genevieve Maitland Hudson
Director
OSCA

Genevieve Maitland Hudson

Genevieve Maitland Hudson

Director
OSCA

Gen is a researcher, evaluator and project designer. She has wide-ranging experience of academic and social research. For the last six years she has worked with public, private and third sector organisations to design programmes that draw on a robust evidence base and demonstrate their effectiveness using appropriate metrics and methodologies. She has a particular interest in the use of human-centred measurement in assessing the effectiveness of social programmes.

Gen leads on research and evaluation at UK consultancy Osca. She works on projects in health, education and organisational change often developing new research methods to suit different people and different styles of delivery. Recent projects have included evaluation of Year of Care implementation for the London Borough of Islington, developing new evaluation measures for a youth employability project and rethinking measurement use in management training for Kent County Council.

Gen also writes about evaluation and social measurement, and has published widely on this topic.

Gen started her career in academia with a doctorate in philosophy and a particular interest in identity. She gravitated from research work on identity towards social research and has lectured on social research methodologies and evaluation at the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris and Birkbeck College London. She was formerly Head of Social Impact at The U, a social venture developed by the Young Foundation, and founder and director of GLUE, a social enterprise working with young people excluded from school.

Isabella Jean
Isabella Jean
Co-Director of Collaborative Learning
CDA

Isabella Jean

Isabella Jean

Co-Director of Collaborative Learning
CDA
@CDALearning

Isabella Jean is the co-director of CDA’s Collaborative Learning wing. Her professional expertise is in conflict-sensitivity, peacebuilding effectiveness, program design, monitoring and evaluation methods, and feedback loops. Isabella has led collaborative learning processes and field research in Africa, Asia, Middle East and Caucasus. In 2012, she co-authored CDA’s book, Time to Listen: Hearing People on the Receiving End of Aid. Isabella continues to lead research on feedback loops and supports CDA’s work on peace building evaluation . Internally, Isabella supports CDA’s monitoring and evaluation efforts to capture the results of our initiatives. Prior to joining CDA, Isabella conducted policy research on conflict, coexistence, democracy and education in multi-ethnic societies. She directed training programs and conducted evaluations of programs for at-risk youth in urban centers in the United States. She currently teaches a graduate-level course on monitoring and evaluation of peacebuilding interventions as an adjunct faculty at Brandeis University’s Heller School. Isabella holds an MA in Conflict and Coexistence from Brandeis University and a BA in International Relations from Bowdoin College

Thad Kerosky
Thad Kerosky
Software Developer
Development Gateway

Thad Kerosky

Thad Kerosky

Software Developer
Development Gateway
@thadk

Thad works on data-oriented software development projects at Development Gateway. Since 2007, he has worked to implement information and communication technology projects with governments, social enterprises, and startups in the United States and in countries across East and West Africa, including Tanzania and Liberia.

Mari Kuraishi Mari Kuraishi
Co-founder and President
GlobalGiving

Mari Kuraishi

Mari Kuraishi

Co-founder and President
GlobalGiving
@mashenka

Mari co-founded GlobalGiving with Dennis Whittle, and currently leads the organization. In 2011, Mari was named one of Foreign Policy’s top 100 Global Thinkers for “crowdsourcing worldsaving.” Before GlobalGiving, she worked at the World Bank where she managed and created some of the Bank’s most innovative projects including the first ever Innovation and Development Marketplaces, and the first series of strategic forums with the World Bank’s president and senior management. Mari also designed a range of investment projects in the Russia reform program, including a residential energy efficiency project, structural adjustment loans, and legal reform project. She currently serves as chair of the board of Guidestar US. She also serves on the board of DataKind, APOPO US, and the Global Business School Network. In addition to her native Japanese, Mari also speaks Russian, Italian, and French. She has an undergraduate degree in history from Harvard University and did graduate work in Russian and Japanese history and politics at Harvard and Georgetown Universities. Mari also completed the Advanced Management Program at Harvard Business School.

Britt Lake
Britt Lake
Senior Director of Programs
GlobalGiving

Britt Lake

Britt Lake

Senior Director of Programs
GlobalGiving
@brittlake

As Senior Director of Programs, Britt oversees relationships with close to 3,000 nonprofits, including managing all of GlobalGiving’s impact measurement, capacity building work, and disaster relief grantmaking. In addition to her seven years at GlobalGiving, Britt has worked at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and with a variety of non-profits in Sierra Leone, South Africa, Kenya, and Zimbabwe. She sits on the boards of Beyond Borders and Retrak America. Britt holds a B.A. in International Studies from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, a Master’s in International Relations from the University of Cape Town (South Africa), and a Master’s in Public Affairs from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School.

Anna Levy
Anna Levy
Governance Project Director
Social Impact Lab

Anna Levy

Anna Levy

Governance Project Director
Social Impact Lab
@SIMLabGov

Anna is the Governance Project Director at Social Impact Lab (SIMLab). The Governance Project focuses on addressing structural inequality in the digital age, related to public service delivery, civic engagement, human rights, conflict and transitions, accountable institutions, data ethics, information rights, and collective political action. She currently serves on the advisory network for Beautiful Rising, a digital exchange for creative political activism in repressive political environments.

Until August 2015, she was a Visiting Fellow at The GovLab, focused on the ethics of open data in international organizations and the digital divide in urban public service delivery. Previously, Anna has worked on national level policies focused on poverty reduction, technology and innovation, human rights during and following political transitions, micro-enterprise development, and sustainable tourism.

Anna has held research and editorial roles on international aid and accountability politics and policy reform in conflict affected countries, on labor market transitions and national technology and innovation policy at Princeton and New York Universities. In 2012, she co-managed a study for Transparency International on the politics of aid accountability in conflict-affected Colombia, Sri Lanka, and Liberia, focused on donor protocols and practice. Since 2008, she has been involved in several grassroots civic initiatives, consulted on social enterprise and municipal planning efforts as well as designed and facilitated more than ten youth service exchanges in Central America and the Navajo and Hopi Nations.

Anna has lived in Jordan, Nicaragua, and the Philippines. She studied human rights in political and economic transitions, Middle East regional studies, and oral history at Columbia’s University’s School of International and Public Affairs.

Lindsay Louie
Lindsay Louie
Program Officer, Effective Philanthropy Group
William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

Lindsay Louie

Lindsay Louie

Program Officer, Effective Philanthropy Group
William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
@lindsaylouie

Lindsay Austin Louie is a Program Officer for the Philanthropy Grantmaking Program, which sits within the Foundation’s Effective Philanthropy Group. In this role, Lindsay supports two grantmaking strategies that seek to increase and improve the effectiveness of all foundations: (1) Knowledge for Better Philanthropy, and (2) the Fund for Shared Insight.

Prior to joining the Foundation, she served as Executive Director of the Silicon Valley Social Venture Fund (SV2). At SV2, she worked closely with donors and grantees to help identify strong nonprofit organizations and then to strengthen those organizations with long-term funding and additional assistance in management, governance, and internal operations. Before leading SV2, Lindsay ran business development for Goodwill Industries of San Francisco, San Mateo and Marin Counties.

Lindsay holds an M.B.A. from the Stanford Graduate School of Business with a certificate in Public Management, as well as an M.A. in Education, M.A. in Sociology, and B.A. in Human Biology from Stanford University. She is the Board President of Counseling and Support Services for Youth (CASSY), a Bay Area nonprofit that provides school-based mental health services in over 30 local public schools.

Nancy MacPherson
Nancy MacPherson
Managing Director, Evaluation
The Rockefeller Foundation

Nancy MacPherson

Nancy MacPherson

Managing Director, Evaluation
The Rockefeller Foundation

As Managing Director, Evaluation, Ms. MacPherson is responsible for developing and managing the Foundation-wide evaluation function at strategy, Initiative and grant portfolio levels, including the assessment of the impact of the Foundation’s work.

Ms MacPherson joined the Foundation following 25 years of experience in development evaluation in Asia and Africa with international development organizations, the United Nations, multilateral and bilateral agencies. Most recently she set up and managed IUCN’s Program and Project Evaluation System and Performance Assessment System, served as Special Advisor to the IUCN Director General on Performance Assessment, and has played a key role in the establishment and nurturing of a number of global and regional development evaluation professional associations, and networks, notably, the International Development Evaluation Association (IDEAS) and the African Evaluation Association (AfrEA). For the past 5 years Nancy has been a member of the teaching faculty at the World Bank’s summer International Program for Development Evaluation Training (IPDET).

Ms. MacPherson holds a master’s degree from Carleton University, Ontario. She has lived and worked in Canada, Africa (Eastern, Southern, West and Central Africa), Asia (India, Pakistan and Afghanistan) and Switzerland.

Andres M
Andres Marquez-Lara
Founder and Passion Catalyst
Promothean Community

Andres M

Andres Marquez-Lara

Founder and Passion Catalyst
Promothean Community
@andresvavz

Andres Marquez-Lara is a skilled facilitator who integrates his background in the fields of mental health, community engagement, and theater through the company he founded, Promethean Community LLC. They help communities solve complex challenges through the use of highly interactive & participatory methods.

Mr. Marquez-Lara has a graduate degree in Clinical Community Psychology from the Universidad Católica Andrés Bello, and an undergraduate degree from Duke University in Psychology with a Certificate in Human Development. He worked for seven years in the Washington, D.C. public mental health system, five of those years at Saint Elizabeths Hospital with the Department of Behavioral Health. He has trained at the East Side Institute in social therapy, and is a Senior Fellow at the George Washington University Center for Excellence in Public Leadership. In 2014, Ashoka and American Express recognized Mr. Marquez-Lara as one of the 2014 emerging social innovators.

Marc Maxmeister
Marc Maxmeister
Senior Knowledge Manager
Keystone Accountability

Marc Maxmeister

Marc Maxmeister

Senior Knowledge Manager
Keystone Accountability
@marcmaxson

Marc is a PhD neuroscientist who focuses on learning from experimentation. He helped design and build the Feedback Commons with Keystone Accountability, coordinate the GlobalGiving Storytelling project (an experiment to provide all organizations with a richer, more complex view of the communities they serve), and helps GlobalGiving measure its impact on other organizations. He was formerly a Peace Corps Volunteer in The Gambia and did a Fulbright research project around the impact of computers and the Internet on rural education in West Africa in 2003. He blogs at chewychunks.wordpress.com and is the author of several books, including Ebola: Local voices, hard facts (2014) and Trello for Project Management (2015), and Trello for Software Developers (2015).

Laura Walker McDonald
Laura Walker McDonald
Chief Executive Officer
Social Impact Lab

Laura Walker McDonald

Laura Walker McDonald

Chief Executive Officer
Social Impact Lab
@techladylaura

As the Chief Executive Officer of the Social Impact Lab Foundation, Laura supports organizations around the world to use mobile technology to transform their work. Drawing on her expertise in humanitarian aid, human rights law and international development, she brings a cross-disciplinary approach to communications, innovation and information management. Laura writes and speaks about SIMLab’s work, and mobile for social change more generally, contributing to technical resources and journals with understandings of good practice in applied mobile communications, with a particular focus on humanitarian aid, and quality and accountability. Before coming to SIMLab, Laura worked for the British Red Cross on international humanitarian policy and learning, focussed on quality and accountability, innovation, urbanisation, cash transfer programming and civil-military relations, as well as strategic planning. Laura holds an LL.B (Hons) in Law, French and German from the University of the West of England, Bristol, and an LL.M in International Development Law and Human Rights from Warwick University.

Bethia McNeil
Bethia McNeil
Director
Centre for Youth Impact

Bethia McNeil

Bethia McNeil

Director
Centre for Youth Impact

Bethia McNeil is Director of the Centre for Youth Impact in England, a role she has held since September 2014. The Centre for Youth Impact supports organisations working with young people to understand and increase their impact.

Bethia has over ten years’ experience of supporting organisations that work with and for young people, particularly in policy and research, evaluation, evidence and service design. She has worked at the Dartington Social Research Unit, the Young Foundation, the National Youth Agency and NIACE. Bethia is an accredited coach and facilitator, and has worked as a teacher and trainer in Further and Higher Education, and in the voluntary sector. She is a 2012 Clore Social Fellow.

Thoai Ngo
Thoai Ngo
Senior Director, Research and Knowledge Management
Innovations for Poverty Action

Thoai Ngo

Thoai Ngo

Senior Director, Research and Knowledge Management
Innovations for Poverty Action
@FitzroviaMania

Thoai Ngo is responsible for directing IPA’s corps of research staff, with the continuous aim of producing high-quality research and promoting learning across IPA and its partners. He is an epidemiologist and demographer with expertise in managing, designing, and evaluating health interventions and programs in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. Prior to joining IPA, Thoai was the Head of Global Research at Marie Stopes International, a researcher at Johns Hopkins University, and a Research Fellow at the National Institutes of Health. He has advised/collaborated with various organizations including DFID, USAID, WHO, the World Bank, private foundations, universities, and governmental bodies on designing and evaluating health programs. Thoai received his PhD in demography and epidemiology from the London School for Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and his Masters of Health Science in Global Epidemiology and Disease Control from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He has authored more than 40 peer-reviewed journal articles, policy reports, and book chapters.

Reem Rahman
Reem Rahman
Senior Knowledge Manager
Ashoka Changemakers

Reem Rahman

Reem Rahman

Senior Knowledge Manager
Ashoka Changemakers
@reemrahman

Reem Rahman works at Ashoka Changemakers as a Product and Knowledge Manager to help anyone with an idea for social change succeed in making a difference. She is passionate about creating open-source tools for learning and designs products to increase collaboration, impact, and sustainability. These have included a dashboard for every social change project to receive custom feedback on strengths and weaknesses, the Changemakers Guide to Pitching and Changemaking Crash Course, as well as guides on trends in social innovation such as the “Social Innovation Mapping: 8 Entrepreneurial Patterns for the Future of Learning.” She is currently leading the implementation of feedback loops within Ashoka’s network of leading social innovators located in over 70 countries around the world.


Ben Ramalingam
Research Associate
ODI

Ben Ramalingam

Research Associate
ODI
@benramalingam

Ben Ramalingam is an independent researcher, consultant and writer specialising on international development and humanitarian issues.

He has worked with and advised leading development and humanitarian organisations including UN bodies, NGOs, the Red Cross movement, and government agencies. He is Chair of the Humanitarian Innovation Fund, the first mechanism dedicated to supporting innovation in international disaster response, which he designed and co-founded.

Ben currently holds honorary and visiting positions at the London School of Economics, the Overseas Development Institute, the Institute of Development Studies at Sussex University and the Royal Veterinary College.

Jean-Louis Sarbib
Jean-Louis Sarbib
Chief Executive Officer
Development Gateway

Jean-Louis Sarbib

Jean-Louis Sarbib

Chief Executive Officer
Development Gateway

Jean-Louis Sarbib is currently Chief Executive Officer at Development Gateway, an international nonprofit social enterprise with the mission to reduce poverty in developing nations by improving aid effectiveness, governance, and transparency through information technology. Mr. Sarbib joined the board of the Development Gateway in 2004 and was elected chair in 2008. In March 2009, the board asked him to serve as chief executive officer.

From 1980 to 2006, Mr. Sarbib was at the World Bank where he occupied a number of senior positions. From 1996 to 2000, Mr. Sarbib was the World Bank’s Vice President for Africa and from 2000 to 2003, the Vice President for the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). His last position (2003 – 2006) was as Senior Vice President for human development, with global responsibilities for the World Bank activities in education, health, social protection, and HIV/AIDS.

Upon leaving the Bank, Mr. Sarbib joined Wolfensohn & Company as a managing director from October 2006 to March 2009. A French national, Mr. Sarbib serves on the boards of World Links for Development, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, The International Center for Conciliation, and FXB International. He served on the board of GAVI (the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization) from 2003 to 2009, the board of UNESCO’s International Institute for Education Planning from 2003 to 2006, chaired the governing board of the UNESCO Institute of Statistics (2004-2006), and represented the World Bank at Head of Agency level at the UN-AIDS Committee of Co-Sponsoring Agencies. He has taught at Georgetown University (2008-2010), and served as senior non-resident fellow at the Brookings Institution (2006-2010) and adviser to James Wolfensohn (2006-2010).

Mr. Sarbib graduated from the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Paris, before going on to the University of Pennsylvania for a master’s degree in city and regional planning. After working for the French Ministry of Industry as Deputy Director of the Groupe de Reflexion sur les Stratégies Industrielles (GRESI), he returned to teach in the United States, at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

In 2006, Mr. Sarbib was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Ouagadougou in Burkina Faso, and received a Lifetime Award for Diversity and Inclusion by the World Bank. He received numerous honors from the countries where he worked.


Sophie Sahaf
Vice President of Evaluation
LIFT

Sophie Sahaf

Sophie Sahaf

Vice President of Evaluation
LIFT
@sophiesahaf

As Vice President of Evaluation, Sophie is responsible for developing and executing LIFT’s learning agenda to ensure a feedback loop from evaluation lessons to program design and implementation. In this role, Sophie works closely with program staff and is responsible for building data collection tools, creating data collection systems and translating data into useful information for internal and external audiences.

Prior to LIFT, Sophie was a Director at the Millennium Challenge Corporation, an organization that makes economic development investments globally. At MCC, she worked closely with government partners in Indonesia, Mongolia, and Sierra Leone to design large-scale human capital and infrastructure projects, identify rigorous evaluation designs for each project, and manage regional staff on tracking performance and conducting large scale evaluations. She also worked on advocacy efforts to improve conditions of refugees in Nepal and to strengthen accountability mechanisms in large multilateral agencies. Sophie received her Master’s and undergraduate degrees from Tufts University.

Justin Sandefur
Justin Sandefur
Research Fellow
Center for Global Development

Justin Sandefur

Justin Sandefur

Research Fellow
Center for Global Development
@justinsandefur

Justin Sandefur is a research fellow at the Center for Global Development. Prior to joining CGD, he spent two years as an adviser to Tanzania’s national statistics office and worked as a research officer at Oxford University’s Centre for the Study of African Economies. His research focuses on a wide range of topics, including education, poverty reduction, legal reform, and democratic governance.

Susan Stout
Susan Stout
Senior Results Advisor
Development Gateway

Susan Stout

Susan Stout

Senior Results Advisor
Development Gateway

Susan is a public health specialist with more than 25 years of experience working on population health and nutrition programs and policy at the World Bank. During those years, she worked to improve the effectiveness of maternal and child health programs in more than 20 countries, as well as on HIV/AIDS programs in at least 10 countries in Africa.

Susan became a champion of the Rapid Results approach while she was leading the Global HIV/AIDS Monitoring and Evaluation Team, an effort to promote harmonization of results management approaches across the many agencies working on HIV/AIDS from 2000-2004.

Susan is currently teaching in the Department of International Health at Georgetown University and is also the Senior Results Advisor at the Development Gateway, which seeks to empower decision makers in developing countries with better information on resource flows and results using new software tools and data visualization techniques. She also consults with the Global Delivery Initiative at the World Bank on the preparation of case studies on the use of adaptive learning in development projects and is in advising on the development of the Results Measurement and Evidence Stream, a new professional category, at the World Bank.

Vikki Tam
Vikki Tam
Partner, New York Office
Bain & Company

Vikki Tam

Vikki Tam

Partner, New York Office
Bain & Company

Vikki Tam is a partner in Bain & Company’s New York office and head of the firm’s Economic Development Practice, which partners with pioneering global organizations that support entrepreneurship in developing and emerging markets to help grow local businesses, create jobs and ultimately alleviate global poverty.

Vikki directs Bain’s global partnerships with Acumen and Endeavor, supporting them on strategy development and operational improvement, and mobilizing talent to help select and accelerate their entrepreneurs. Vikki also collaborates on research development, including the 2014 Bain-Acumen report, Growing Prosperity: Developing Repeatable Models® to Scale the Adoption of Agricultural Innovations, focused on helping entrepreneurial companies, and others, unlock the potential of smallholder farmers through large-scale adoption of agricultural innovations.

In addition to her client work, Vikki leads Bain’s semi-annual Net Promoter Social Impact Forum. The forum brings together executives from leading non-profits to share best practices on using Bain’s proprietary Net Promoter SystemSM to enhance stakeholder loyalty and shape how impact is measured in the social sector.

Prior to her current role, Vikki was based in Bain’s Shanghai office, where she led the firm’s Telecom, Media & Technology and Organization Practices in Greater China. There, she worked with local and multinational companies on business growth strategies, market entry, organizational design and corporate performance improvement. She also oversaw Bain’s multi-year relationship with Jet Li’s One Foundation, China’s first non-government public foundation.


Akhilesh Tewari
Sarathi Development Foundation

Akhilesh Tewari

Director
Sarathi Development Foundation
Akhilesh Tewari has worked for 26 years as grassroots worker, social scientist, advisor to the government, researcher, trainer, director and consultant with a range of agencies including government, national and international charity organizations, UN organizations and corporates. His key areas of expertise include program design, implementation planning, participatory management, convergence, and monitoring and evaluation. He conceptualized and established Sarathi Development Foundation to equip and empower communities to identify and solve their own problems, while leveraging government systems and policies aimed at delivering services. During his seventeen years at Sarathi, he has designed and managed large scale, people-centered and convergence driven programs in partnership with agencies like UNICEF, Catholic Relief Services, Dsara, Water Aid, and FHI 360.


Riva Thapa
Tewa

Riva Thapa

Tewa

Riva Thapa is a graduate of Tribhuwan University, with a degree in Women’s Studies. She also volunteers her time for TEWA, a network in Nepal exclusively funded by women, to fundraise and offer support to women in rural areas of Nepal. As a member of Nagarik Awaaz, she has volunteered in their “Peace Kitchen,” which helps to feed the most marginalized citizens of Kathmandu.

Valerie Threlfall
Valerie Threlfall
Project Lead
Fund for Shared Insight

Valerie Threlfall

Valerie Threlfall

Project Lead
Fund for Shared Insight
@valthrelfall

Valerie Threlfall is Project Lead for the Listen for Good initiative of the Fund for Shared Insight. In this role, she is guiding the design of the Listen for Good offering and leading all grantee support efforts for the initiative. Valerie is an independent consultant focused on strategy development and performance measurement design for nonprofit organizations. Most recently, Valerie served as founding director of the Center for Effective Philanthropy’s (CEP) YouthTruth project, scaling the project from an idea to a nationally recognized survey and data analysis organization capturing youth perspectives. More than 85 percent of participating educators report using the student feedback gathered through YouthTruth to inform their programmatic and policy decisions. Under Valerie’s tenure, YouthTruth surveyed more than 125,000 students from 210 schools around the United States. Prior to joining CEP, Valerie was part of the core business team that built a successful start-up biotechnology company, Momenta Pharmaceuticals (publicly traded, $750MM at peak).

Melinda Tuan
Melinda Tuan
Project Manager
Fund for Shared Insight

Melinda Tuan

Melinda Tuan

Project Manager
Fund for Shared Insight

Melinda is the project manager for Fund for Shared Insight (“Shared Insight”). In that capacity, Melinda plays a key role in guiding and facilitating Shared Insight’s activities including operations, communications, grantmaking, and evaluation. Melinda is an independent consultant who works with the senior leadership of philanthropic organizations to develop strategies for effective philanthropy. Prior to starting her consulting practice in 2003, Melinda was managing director of REDF (formerly The Roberts Enterprise Development Fund) – a social venture capital fund she co-founded, served as a manager at a national healthcare nonprofit, and worked as a management consultant.


Johannes Tonn
Research Manager
Global Integrity

Johannes Tonn

Research Manager
Global Integrity
@johntonn

Johannes joined Global Integrity in April 2013 and is currently managing the data collection for the “Africa Integrity Indicators 2014″ project. Other projects he has worked on include the 2013 Web Index, the “Money, Politics and Transparency Project” and the second round of the Africa Integrity Indicators. Prior to joining Global Integrity he worked on a variety of governance projects, including social accountability-focused grassroots work with the Partnership for Transparency Fund (PTF) and supporting the decentralization process in Ecuador with the German Development Corporation (GIZ). Before moving to DC, Johannes worked for the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS) in Nigeria, facilitating the implementation of a DDR project in the Niger Delta. He has also supported the communication efforts of both UNDP and UNV during a three months internship in Mongolia, preparing the high-level visit of HRH Crown Prince of Norway while learning about participatory governance programs at the same time. Johannes obtained his Masters in political science, economics and international law at Heidelberg University, Germany, concentrating on the political economy of coordination processes within international organizations. He has served as a member of the board at the World Bank Family Network and as a volunteer for numerous other organizations, including the International Peace Observers Network (Philippines), the American Field Service, la Fundación Proyecto Salesiano Chicos de la Calle and the Carlo Schmid Program. He speaks English, German and Spanish.

Dennis Whittle
Dennis Whittle
Co-Founder and Executive Director
Feedback Labs

Dennis Whittle

Dennis Whittle

Co-Founder and Executive Director
Feedback Labs
@DennisWhittle

Dennis Whittle is co-founder and director of Feedback Labs. He was also co-founder of GlobalGiving, the first global crowdfunding + crowdsourcing website, where he was CEO from 2000-2010. Earlier, he was Lead Economist at the World Bank, where his team created the Innovation and Development Marketplaces – an approach which has been replicated in over one hundred countries by the World Bank and many other aid agencies, foundations, and impact investors. He has served in the past as Executive Chairman of Ashoka Changemakers, Visiting Fellow at the Center for Global Development, Visiting Lecturer at Princeton University, Professor of the Practice and Entrepreneur in Residence at UNC-Chapel Hill, and Board Director of Internews.

Diana Wells
Diana Wells
President
Ashoka

Diana Wells

Diana Wells

President
Ashoka

Diana joined Ashoka after graduating from Brown University in 1988 with a degree in South Asian Studies. As an undergraduate, her year-long study abroad in Varanasi, India led her to see the need for local solutions to solve global problems. This insight inspired her to pursue an internship at Ashoka, where she created one of its core programs, Fellowship Support Services, (now Fellowship) which expanded the resources available to Ashoka’s social entrepreneurs to connect them to one another. When Diana took a leave to pursue a Ph.D. in anthropology from New York University (2000), she was named both a Fulbright and Woodrow Wilson scholar. Her ethnographic research on understanding how social change happens as a local articulation of a global social movement resulted in her dissertation: ‘Between the Difference: The Emergence of a Cross Ethnic Women’s Movement in Trinidad and Tobago.’

Ph.D. in hand, Diana returned to Ashoka as a leader in the worldwide process of selecting social entrepreneurs to be Ashoka fellows. Additionally, she was given responsibility for Ashoka’s geographic expansion and during her tenure, there was a significant increase of Fellow elections, allowing Ashoka to reach its current total of 3,000. She became the President of Ashoka in 2005. She has contributed significantly to the field of social entrepreneurship by implementing one of the first, and now widely respected, tools to measure the impact of social entrepreneurship.

She is on the Advisory Board for the Center for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship (CASE) at Duke’s Fuqua School of Business and on the Board of GuideStar International. She has taught at Georgetown University on Anthropology and Development and has authored and edited numerous journal and book publications, including two compilations on social movements in the United States.

In 2007, Diana was celebrated as one of 10 winners of the first annual Women to Watch award, by Running Start. She also received the first Social Innovation Champion Award at George Mason University’s Accelerating Social Entrepreneurship (ASE) conference in 2011. Since then, in 2012, her alma mater, Brown University, honored her with its highest distinction for graduates, the Williams Rogers Award, in recognition of exemplifying Brown’s mission to prepare alumni for lives of “usefulness and reputation.”

Janee Wilson-Key
Janee Wilson-Key
Associate Director, Neighborhood Revitalization
Habitat for Humanity International

Janee Wilson-Key

Janee Wilson-Key

Associate Director, Neighborhood Revitalization
Habitat for Humanity International

Janee rejoined Habitat in March 2015 as part of the Neighborhood Revitalization team. In this role, Wilson-Key is responsible for fundraising support, developing national partnerships and overseeing a project a management team. She previously served at Habitat International from 2009 – 2011 where she managed the FlexCap program – a $40M social impact investment fund ; she leveraged her experience as an Investment Banking Analyst with JPMorgan to help Habitat grow the program. Wilson-Key then earned her MBA at Harvard Business School and then joined McKinsey & Company before her return to Habitat.

Feedback Summit 2015 Opening Salon

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Summit 2015 Agenda

  • Welcome and Opening Remarks

State of the Feedback Field

If people are experts of their own conditions, then we need to work in ways that locate their agency at the heart of development and social change practice. Feedback, or as it is sometimes called Constituent Voice, is now emerging as a distinct practice and stakes a claim to be a vital tool for bringing about people-led development. This session interrogates this claim from three distinct disciplines or vantage points: business customer service, impact evaluation, and philanthropy/social investing.

Discussants: David Bonbright, Vikki Tam, Nancy MacPherson, Diana Wells

Should we really listen to all voices?

Most participants at the Summit believe that people should be in the drivers seat of policies and programs that affect them. But who exactly do we mean by “the people?” Many societies limit the ability of children to have full agency (or a full “vote”) over programs that affect them. Some communities and societies limit the rights of women and/or other population segments. Who should have a full “vote” in the programs that affect them? Whose voice should be heard but not necessarily listened to? And, in a broader sense, is there such as thing as the “voice of the community” that is different from the aggregated voice of individuals?

Discussants: Bethia McNeil, Brooke Bocast, Renee Ho

Totally Intrusive Measurement: putting ‘feedback’ into the heart of what we do

We often take a naïve approach to the idea of measurement in social programs. We imagine that a ‘good’ measure will be like a litmus test: it will give us a straight answer that we can interpret easily (if we can only get the right instrument). We think of measurement as dry and neutral, a parallel process that is, and should be, outside the program itself. This session will explore feedback and measurement as active and creative components of program delivery, components that frame what we do and how we do it (including how we change program as a result), and influence every person involved(including empowerment of beneficiaries in the feedback process itself). We will look at examples of measurement and feedback mechanisms/approaches that are core to the program that use them, in ways very different to ‘clean’, external and perfectionist measures. We will make the case for these ‘messy’ measures and outline a framework for human-centered measurement that builds on them and creates opportunities for sustainable accountable community based processes which transfer the balance of power to program participants.

Discussants: Genevieve Hudson, Brad Dudding, Laura Walker McDonald

Accountability to Affected Persons”: Feedback in Humanitarian Contexts

For 30 years the humanitarian sector has been talking about “accountability to affected persons”. What are the lessons from this long road? Why is the current push more promising than its predecessors? What are the unique characteristics of humanitarian responses that make responding to feedback different/easier/harder? What are the feedback innovations and achievements that the rest of the world can learn from? What cautionary lessons?

Discussants: David Bonbright, Blair Glencorse, Riva Thapa, Sheree Bennett, Isabella Jean

Business Models, Business Models, Business Models!

Even when feedback loops are the right thing to do ethically, the smart thing to do in terms of impact, and the feasible thing to do technically, the big question remains: how do we pay for them? Will constituent feedback become just another nice-to-have but unfunded mandate? Will it become another cynical “check-box” compliance exercise? What would it take for feedback loops to become an integral part of an organization’s financing model? Could we imagine scenarios where feedback loops would be a net revenue source rather than an added cost? These questions are front and center for implement agencies, funders, feedback tool providers, and even networks such as Feedback Labs itself. Join us for a spirited discussion as several participants discuss how they are grappling with these issues.

Discussants: Dennis Whittle, Sachin Malhan, Britt Lake, David Bonbright

How to foster cultures that embrace feedback? Fusing Strategies, Incentives, Behaviors and Methods

A major concern for feedback efforts is that they fall prey to bureaucracy, and become more about the mechanical application of tools and processes than about creative approaches for catalysing people-led development. For those organizations or business units promoting feedback, this is a very real risk. It can be all too tempting for donors to start demanding feedback from grantees, for headquarters to push feedback initiatives onto country offices, for Northern NGOs to define appropriate feedback processes for their southern partners, and so on. But genuine feedback movements require the fostering of organizational cultures that actively embrace feedback. This means drawing on a number of ingredients, including: strategy and purpose, incentives and motivations, behaviours and attitudes, and methods and approaches. While these are the core ingredients, there are many different recipes to be applied in different contexts.

In this collaborative session, attendees will share their own recipes for success and hear how GlobalGiving and Ashoka have worked to encourage rather than impose the feedback agenda on their different constituents. The session will close with a session where participants work together to develop a shared list of ingredient for future use.

Discussants: Ben Ramalingam, Britt Lake, Reem Rahman

Quicker, Better, Cheaper: Impact Measurement and Feedback Tools

Few if any organizations have the resources to do randomized controlled trials on all aspects of their programs, so they are searching for alternative approaches for monitoring and evaluation to ensure they are learning and getting better. This session will discuss optimal strategies for allocating scarce resources. Innovative tools that take advantage of Big Data and machine learning will be presented, as well as the use of predictive and prescriptive analytics to provide meaningful and real time information for both beneficiaries and providers.I Some argue that these new approaches and technologies have dramatically reduced the cost of getting feedback and managing and measuring what matters most, while going beyond doing “good enough” to doing even better than more traditional approaches.

Discussants: Caroline Fiennes, Ken Berger, Louis Dorval

300 or 3000 Kilometers in Someone Else’s Shoes: The myth (for some) of closing the feedback loop

Through a short simulation, participants in this session assume the identities of different people, organizational leaders, and agency contacts involved in improving specialized health service access and delivery for low-income Ugandans. Reflecting a real scenario, participants will represent technologists, public health officials, international consulting teams, Ugandans with different public health needs and economic realities, and community health practitioners among others. Participants in the role play navigate personal and organizational interests, limited information and timelines along with overlapping and competing goals, and close up with a discussion on the challenges, ethical dilemmas, design questions, and opportunities for both identifying and closing feedback loops in complex environments. Among other topics, we’ll address (through experience) the limitations/aspirations of technology, balancing feedback loops with different time horizons, aid and national politics, individual and institutional placement within larger feedback loops.

Discussants: Anna Levy, Mari Kuraishi

Catalyzing the Feedback Field: the Role of Foundations and Funders

Several leading foundations formed the Fund for Shared Insight (Shared Insight) in 2014 to improve philanthropy by engaging more funders in listening to, learning from, and acting on what they hear from the people they seek to help. Shared Insight also seeks to help the foundation sector to be more open about what they do, how they work, and why they make decisions. Join Lindsay Louie of the Hewlett Foundation, Melinda Tuan of the Fund for Shared Insight, Nancy MacPherson of the Rockefeller Foundation, for a discussion about what they have learned in their first year of operation – and where they see the challenges and opportunities for the years ahead. Caroline Fiennes of Giving Evidence UK will give insights from her perspective as an advisor to other philanthropists in the US and worldwide.

Discussants: Melinda Tuan, Lindsay Louie, Caroline Fiennes, Nancy MacPherson

What do you do when constituents disagree with experts?

TThe “old” model was based on an assumption that experts should analyze problems and generate appropriate policies and projects that would then be adopted by policy makers and implementing agencies. But what if policy makers don’t agree with experts? And what if the people themselves don’t agree with either? This session will highlight the results of recent studies at the where experts, police makers, and regular people disagree – sometimes sharply – and raise the question of what the “new” model should be.
Discussants: Nathaniel Heller, Samantha Custer, Justin Sandefur, Thoai Ngo

Feedback and M&E: When can we expect it to work?

In a world focused on monitoring and evaluation (M&E) and achieving social impact, how do we know that collecting constituent feedback matters? When is this kind of perceptual feedback correlated to important outcomes? How is this feedback measured? How can this feedback help monitor project implementation or provide a new dimension to evaluation? Is feedback likely to be more useful in the former (monitoring and altering implementation) or the latter (evaluation), and will this answer be different in different places and projects? Will feedback ever alter projects in bad ways, or only good ones? What needs to change within organizational structures, internal management and frameworks of accountability for feedback to have “teeth”?
Discussants: Dan Honig, Susan Stout, Sophie Sahaf, Zack Brisson

Listen for Good: What can we learn from experimenting with NPS in the beneficiary context?

In summer 2015, the Fund for Shared Insight launched Listen for Good, an initiative dedicated to building the practice of listening to the people we seek to help. Listen for Good is specifically focused on exploring the application of the Net Promoter System℠ (NPS®), which has been used widely in customer feedback circles, to the nonprofit beneficiary context.

Fund for Shared Insight is currently making grants to 50 nonprofit organizations that work domestically and will test a customized NPS survey with their beneficiaries – across different fields and issue areas. Through this work, we hope to inspire organizations to collect feedback more routinely; engage the funder community more intentionally in supporting beneficiary feedback; and begin to build useful benchmarks for constituent voice.

Come learn more about this Initiative and help us answer some challenging design questions in this interactive workshop!

Discussants: Valerie Threlfall, Lindsay Louie

Interoperability for Everyone

There is a surprisingly small amount of aggregated data about the work of organizations worldwide. This is because we operate in parallel. Whenever we try to coordinate and share data, we run into barriers.

In this session we’ll present three examples of simple but meaningful solutions to interoperability problems, and lessons we gleaned from working through these problems. Ever had to report the same disaster response data to 5 multilateral agencies? Have you found yourself buried in dozens of excel documents that have inconsistent columns and incompatible formats? Or needed to merge your latest online survey with SMS data and historical baseline data? These are just some of the problems we’ve solved. Come prepared to ask us questions about YOUR specific data exchange problems!

Discussants: Marc Maxmeister, Nick Hamlin, Thad Kerosky

Data, Data, Data!

Recent advances in technology, including the big data revolution, along with the recent adoption of the SDGs have generated excitement and optimism, but also big questions. Who should decide which data matters – and therefore should be collected? Who owns this data and should see the results of the analysis? How exactly do we believe this data will result in different and better programs that improve lives? And finally, how can we be sure that the data itself won’t be used against the very people it is intended to help? Join us to discuss the opportunities and potential pitfalls of data.

Discussants: Lucy Bernholz, Samantha Custer, Johannes Tonn, Kathrin Frauscher

Feedback and the Interview: Using Journalistic Approaches to Gather Feedback

Traditionally, aid agencies, philanthropic funders, and many researchers have relied heavily on structured surveys to determine what people want and how they feel about what they are getting. Respondents are often asked to answer pre-determined questions with close-ended multiple-choice answers. Journalists, on the other hand, have developed interpersonal approaches and tools that elicit more open-ended responses about what is really happening and what people actually care about. In this hands-on session, you will learn tools and interview techniques that lead to a deeper understanding of problems arising in the field, which can help you make better-informed decisions about your own programs and initiatives. We will explore ways to combine open-ended information-gathering techniques with the structured data we more often collect. Join a former BBC, NPR, and PRI Africa correspondent for a discussion of how journalistic approaches to gathering feedback can help funders and service providers know what people care about, whether we are helping them get it, and if not, what we can do differently.

Discussants: Amy Costello, Mari Kuraishi

What have we learned?

What do we mean by feedback? Whose feedback? How do we understand this feedback as data?

Two days later…. what have we learned? What questions remain? And what do we need to do next? We convene in small groups for an open-ended discussion and reflections. What do we mean by “feedback”? What is the difference between feedback, engagement, and voice? How do we prevent “feedback” from being another check-box for people to “do”?

Discussants: Andres Marquez-Lara, Britt Lake, Nancy Choi, Blair Glencorse, Janee Wilson-Key

Looking Ahead: The Agenda for 2016

Fast forward to October 2016. We are coming together for our second Feedback Summit. What are the headlines for the past year? What research have we done? What new approaches have we pioneered? What partnerships have we forged? Who else have we invited to this second gathering? And most significantly, how have we “moved the needle” in terms of better listening and responding to the voice of the people in aid, philanthropy, and even governance?

Discussants: Marc Gunther, Dennis Whittle, other select attendees