Framing

 
 
We frame the feedback loops conversation by helping our target audiences understand the value of incorporating feedback loops in aid and philanthropy. We do this by "curating" (collecting and distilling) key insights from emerging practices and conceptual models. Framing is done through our research and writing and our blog.
The Reading List below is a good starting point for framing the feedback conversation in the aid and philanthropy sector.
 
 

Theory & Concepts

These articles outline the inception of Feedback Labs and the theories shaping the thought behind it.

 
 
 
 

Companies that listen to their consumers by modifying existing products and launching new ones have a chance of increasing their revenues and profits; companies that don’t are at risk of going out of business. Is it possible to create analogous mechanisms that require aid organizations to listen to what regular citizens want—and then act on what they hear?

 
 
 
 

Companies that listen to their consumers by modifying existing products and launching new ones have a chance of increasing their revenues and profits; companies that don’t are at risk of going out of business. Is it possible to create analogous mechanisms that require aid organizations to listen to what regular citizens want—and then act on what they hear?

 
 

Listening to Those Who Matter Most, the Beneficiaries by Fay Twersky, Phil Buchanan, and Valerie Threlfall

 
 

Companies that listen to their consumers by modifying existing products and launching new ones have a chance of increasing their revenues and profits; companies that don’t are at risk of going out of business. Is it possible to create analogous mechanisms that require aid organizations to listen to what regular citizens want—and then act on what they hear?

 
 

The ALMOST Feedback Loop by Dennis Whittle and David Boyd

 
 

There are frequently mechanisms which allow information to flow from producers to consumers, but how do we complete the loop by allowing consumers to send information back to producers as well?

 
 
 
 

Industrialized nations can make their most important contributions to development by supporting citizen agency through facilitating the exchange of information.

 
 

Methodology for Experiments

 
 
 
 

There are frequently mechanisms which allow information to flow from producers to consumers, but how do we complete the loop by allowing consumers to send information back to producers as well?

 
 

Distinguishing Participation and Inclusion by Kathy S. Quick and Martha S. Feldman

 
 

In corruption monitoring in Indonesia, grass-roots participation had impacts in some but not all of the areas that were improved by top-down monitoring. This underscores the importance of understanding where citizen voice can have the most efficacy for designing future engagement programs.